Load balanced Kubernetes Ingress. So metal.

Kubernetes has some incredible features, one of them being Ingress. Ingress can be described as a way to give external access to a Kubernetes-run service, typically over HTTP(S). This is useful when you run webapps (Grafana, Binder) in your Kubernetes cluster that need to be accessed by users across your network. Typically, Ingress integrates with … Continue reading Load balanced Kubernetes Ingress. So metal.

Kubernetes, CoreOS, and many lines of Python later.

Several months after my last post, and lots of code hacking, I can rebuild CoreOS-based bare-metal Kubernetes cluster in roughly 20 minutes. It only took  ~1300 lines of Python following Kelsey Hightower’s Kubernetes the Hard Way instructions. Why? The challenge. But really, why? I like to hack on code at home, and spinning up a new VM … Continue reading Kubernetes, CoreOS, and many lines of Python later.

No more powerline networking in this house.

I finally got around to wiring Cat6 to my desktop machines at home, and ripped out those powerline network adapters. I ran a test if iperf between my desktop and my router before and after the upgrade to see how things fared. iperf results before: desktop1:~$ iperf -f m -V -t 30 -c 10.10.0.1 ———————————————————— … Continue reading No more powerline networking in this house.

A simplified way to securely move all the bits.

A while back, I wrote a post about setting up an L2TP/IPSec VPN on my home firewall/router. It required two daemons and a bunch of configuration that had hard coded IP addresses. While this solution used firmly-established practices (L2TP/IPSec), it felt too brittle. What happens when my dynamic IP address changes? Now I need to update config files, … Continue reading A simplified way to securely move all the bits.